Categorias
Billets

The abderitic

Abderitic is a play on words, a thought made up of charades, which according to José Anastácio da Cunha was a characteristic of a scholastic and Jesuit system of thought, marked by the Inquisition.

He then said in his “Literary News about Portugal”, written in 1780:-“What to expect from a Nation in which half awaits the Messiah and the other Dom Sebastião”. And he argued: -“The taste for geometry, for oriental languages, for Greek ended in Portugal. The taste for Concetti, word games, which then began to contaminate Italy, taken to excess by the Spaniards, quickly transformed us into abderites. “.

Cunha, a mathematician persecuted by the Inquisition, will largely be a path of scientific thought and literary studies in Portugal.

Categorias
Billets

The Snake Narrative by Manu Romeiro

Exhibition in MED – Museu Educação e Diversidade and Anagrama-

March 12, at 5:30 PM in MED – Lisbon – Av Berlim 35 C

Categorias
Academia MED educação patrimonial

How to survive in Christmas- Storytelling

Categorias
Academia MED Billets

The Power of Storytelling in Social Museums

This is a course that offers a methodology to tell socially relevant stories through community participation.

  • How do we tell powerful stories in museums?
  • Why and haw to use storytelling in museums?
  • What is social practice in the museum?

The course will provide a set of tools to tell stories in a cultural institution or in educational context.

It will be a journey through the recognition of social memory, common heritage. A path leading to the encounter.

We will travel from a meeting for self-recognition to discover what is in common with others to tell relevant stories.

With the tools developed during the course, each participant seeks to connect with the public and foster social change. A set of practical challenges will be launched through participatory methodologies. At the end, participants face the challenge of developing a relevant activity in their community.

Categorias
Billets

The Game and the Museums

For a few years, when I had the time and availability to observe what the museums in Lisbon were producing that were relevant, I visited an exhibition organized by the Sports Museum, curated by its Director Pedro Cardoso Pereira, where he proposed an exhibition based on this approach. of the “GAME in Sport”
It was then an experimental narrative, on a topic that, as we all know, is of great social relevance. The game is present in the daily lives of all ages, from the youngest to the oldest, from schools to leisure, exalted as a virtue or punished as a vice.
As we all know, in our decaying museums, which are serious institutions, play is absent, and therefore museums are not places to play.
But, let us imagine thinking of the Museum as a game space. Like a canvas where, for a defined time, and in a certain space, a story is created: A place where a special activity is practiced
The game is a representation of social life limited in space and time. It is processed according to previously defined rules. It has real and imaginary norms. Cheating is not allowed, nor is it allowed to change the rules halfway through.
The Game is a representation of Freedom!
Does a reflection on the place of the Game in Museums make sense?
I have stayed with the subject under my eye and have been working on the issue. But as with everything else, nothing better than practicing:
Saturday, November 13: Family Games Afternoon –
15:00 – 18:00 Anagrama – Av. Berlin 35 C Lisbon
Education and Diversity Museum

“The limitation in space is even more blatant than the limitation in time. Every game is processed and exists within a previously delimited field, in a material or imaginary, deliberate or spontaneous way. Just as there is no formal difference between the game and the cult, so the ‘sacred place’ cannot be formally distinguished from the game’s terrain. The arena, the game table, the magic circle, the temple, the stage, the screen, the tennis court, the court, etc., all have the form and function of playing grounds, that is, forbidden, isolated places. , closed, sacred, within which certain rules are respected. All of them are temporary worlds within the habitual world, dedicated to the practice of a special activity (Jhoan Huizing, Homo Ludens, 2014, p. 13).

Categorias
Billets educação patrimonial

The Game and the Museums


Gameling and Museums

Saturday, November 13: Family Games Afternoon –
15:00 – 18:00 Anagrama – Av. Berlin 35 C Lisbon
Education and Diversity Museum

For a few years, when I had the time and availability to observe what the museums in Lisbon were producing that were relevant, I visited an exhibition organized by the Sports Museum, curated by its Director Pedro Cardoso Pereira, where he proposed an exhibition based on this approach. of the “GAME in Sport”

It was then an experimental narrative, on a topic that, as we all know, is of great social relevance. The game is present in the daily lives of all ages, from the youngest to the oldest, from schools to leisure, exalted as a virtue or punished as a vice.

As we all know, in our decaying museums, which are serious institutions, play is absent, and therefore museums are not places to play. But, let us imagine thinking of the Museum as a game space. Like a canvas where, for a defined time, and in a certain space, a story is created: A place where a special activity is practiced.

The game is a representation of social life limited in space and time. It is processed according to previously defined rules. It has real and imaginary norms. Cheating is not allowed, nor is it allowed to change the rules halfway through.

The Game is a representation of Freedom!

Does a reflection on the place of the Game in Museums make sense?

I have stayed with the subject under my eye and have been working on the issue. But as with everything, nothing better than practicing:

The limitation in space is even more blatant than the limitation in time. Every game is processed and exists within a previously delimited field, in a material or imaginary, deliberate or spontaneous way. Just as there is no formal difference between the game and the cult, so the ‘sacred place’ cannot be formally distinguished from the game’s terrain. The arena, the game table, the magic circle, the temple, the stage, the screen, the tennis court, the court, etc., all have the form and function of playing grounds, that is, forbidden, isolated places. , closed, sacred, within which certain rules are respected. All of them are temporary worlds within the habitual world, dedicated to the practice of a special activity (Jhoan Huizing, Homo Ludens, 2014, p. 13).

Categorias
Billets

Acknowledgment Notes for the APOM Award (Lectures Category) 2021

• Hon. Mr. Direct from the Maritime Museum Comodoro Favinha
• Hon. Mr. President of APOM Dr. João Neto
• Messrs. Armed Forces Officers
• Dear Members of the Social Bodies of the Portuguese Association of Museology
• Dear Colleagues and friends of museums
I am naturally recognized with the distinction now conferred on me which greatly honors me. However, I would like to highlight what the award seeks to distinguish, more than I have done and have been doing. The award seeks to show the relevance of our cultural space in the world and the bridges and encounters of our culture in Portuguese and the vitality of its communities.
If I managed to contribute to that, as this award distinguishes, I am very satisfied. But we all know that this goal is never completely completed and there will be a lot to do with the contribution of all of us, the museological community.
It is a pity that, contrary to what was announced, we did not have the presence of the S. President of the Republic at this ceremony. We all understand that maybe that was what he wanted, but the imperatives of his presidential mission compel other devotions, which are more priority at this time. But I know that Nosso Professor Marcelo is a fan of our museums.
I know this not only from observing his actions, but from having shared some of his schools as a child. I know that by the hand of her (our) teacher from the primary school, Berta Ávila de Melo, she visited the Museu das Janelas Verdes, where the first educational services were emerging. By the hand of João Couto and Madalena Cabral, with the support of the recently created APOM, the educational function in museums was discussed. I well remember the fascination of entering that museum space and exploring its “treasures”.
I also know that our President, when he was a student at the Liceu Pedro Nunes, admired the Physics Museum, animated with affection by Rómulo de Carvalho. Generations of students dreamed of “The Philosopher’s Stone” by our poet António Gedeão, which showed how the balloons that children dropped rose until they turned into stars.
All this to draw your attention, once again to the importance of museums as spaces for meeting and living. After this pandemic, more than ever, we need to turn our museums into living spaces.
As Rabelais said, humanity has to rethink its relationship with happiness. We cannot remain stuck in the past and anxious about the future. We have to live in the present time and take advantage of our resources to bring laughter and joy into museums.
How can we do this?
With our educational tools. With our ability to bring museums to life and make them meeting spaces
That’s what we can do in our diversity culture space.
This is the message I leave you and I thank you, once again, for your attention.

Pedro Pereira Leite (Education and Diversity Museum) October 29, 2021

Categorias
Ecomuseus educação patrimonial

Museums are things too serious to be taken seriously!

One of the symptoms of the decline of Portuguese museums is the atrocious impossibility of them to manifest the Laughter.

When we enter a museum, the smiles we see in its visitors are rare. There is no room for laughter. The objects embodied in his plinths do not elicit any laughter. When we leave museums we do not feel any happiness, although “surveys to the satisfaction of visitors” are one of the current tools of what can be called “cultural marketing”, they never ask if we are happy. It is true that they ask, on a scale of 1 to 5 if we like, if we will return, if we recommend a friend. But happiness is an absence. Never ask if we laugh, if we are happy, though happiness is a criterion of satisfaction.

So little, in the current search of the ICOM community, for a new museum concept (https://icofom.mini.icom.museum/zoom-meeting-with-co-chairs-of-icom-define/), we checked the mobilization of the search for the dimension of happiness and laughter in the museum. We can then verify a correspondence between this absence of nouns or adjectives directly related to the generative tree of laughter (and happiness) and the practices of so-called museology (traditional or objects).

What I am trying to show, in my thesis, is whether in museums we could be happier, or stay happier, we would be closer to a comprehensive museum. A museum that achieves a design of relevance to society, in addition to the great collection of objects of hegemonic memories. And there are several examples of such experiences.

In Jean Luc-Godard’s film “Band à Part” (1964) the protagonists Anna Karina, Samy Frey and Claude Brasseur try to break the record for the fastest visit to the Louvre. (https://youtu.be/J9i771qYngY). This experience, which is a practice of happiness and well-being, warned, in the protesters of the sixties of the last century, about the need to open museums to the world. “Let the Seine cross the Louvre,” wrote the sixty-eight rebels on the walls of the Museum. It was then a sign of change, which Santiago sought to interpret.

It’s been a few years, in a meeting I had at the Museu dos Coches in Lisbon where I did some reflections on the proposals for work in museology and launched some challenges to museums in Portugal: With the title “a museology that is useless for life is useless”, As is customary in our land, these kinds of ideas are the target of the piece of “gerontocracy” illuminated and forgotten in the garbage cans of seminaries built for statistical purposes and career management.

The structural idea of his work was based on a reading (or search) of the need to adapt museological processes to the times of the city. This is because, at the time, I had the perception that Museums, as places where processes of patrimonial memory took shape, were, as they still remain, increasingly out of step with the rhythms and senses of the world. Museums, in Portugal, are more and more places of other times with narratives where analogue monovision emerges as more and more frightening forms in its fake production configuration.

For those who have the patience to observe that in museums there are no laughs or even a few smiles, this is visible to the naked eye. These post-pandemic times are an example of this. As we witness in the city the enormous happiness of this reunion with life and with others, now that the Pandemic is under control, museums continue with “their usual business” of selling cultural programs of yesteryear, stereos and without feeling the pulsation of life.

Despite everything, there are proposals from social museology to enhance laughter. To work with happiness. The proposals of Pierre Mayrand, in this country of ours, and a few years ago I spoke of it, are an example of this, although as usual things have gone unnoticed in these museologies which, for fashion reasons, claim to be critical. The debate is even denser than it may seem at first glance, rooted in Renaissance debates, as we will speak elsewhere.

But let’s go to the absence of the laugh in the city’s museums.

Returning from an experience in Barcelona, I was amazed to see that the city was full of young people laughing in the streets. Some of them gathered in the museums of the “Barrio Chinó/La Raval”, occupied bookshops, played outdoors and extolled what made them happy: -Live life! It was an experience of happiness “walking the streets remembering Francisco Ferrer, the educator shot after the tumult of the tragic week of 1909.

In our capital Lisbon, I faced the city without laughter, anxious, without youth. Closed bookstores, no people. Cultural centres and lifeless libraries. It is true that the population has aged. It is true that young people in the country have an appetite for riparian areas where access to beers is easy and uncontrolled. It is true that the schools have resumed, and as such the necessary occupation the daily. But still, what justifies the absence of laughter in the city’s proposals? And in their museums?

There are some hypotheses that are worth thinking of as a critical exercise. One of them is the “aging” of museums. All social organizations have a life cycle. A youth, irreverent and creative; a maturity when its services extend to society, and a definition, when its services cease to adjust to the rhythms and needs of the city.

Social organizations, as living bodies, are subject to the laws of nature and need to show their social relevance. IF they do not show their value to society, they cease to be relevant. They define and society stops counting on them. They are replaced by other forms of organization.

It is true that there is always the possibility of adaptation and regeneration of social organizations. If museums are aging they may eventually reinvent themselves, recreate themselves. They will be able to take on new forms and new qualities, as intended by this new conceptual search.

This is clear, if this question, of its social value, is a problem, as I actually think it is, although many still do not understand it.

To simplify, we can think that this symptom of lack of adaptation, this kind of social Darwinism, applied to the analysis of the functions of museums, is nothing more than the entropy that general theory of systems shows us. Any system is permanently in the process of producing synergies and entropies. Will that theory work for museums?

If so, a museum, or museums in Portugal, as social organizations, observed from the general theory of systems, as a set of interconnected units that perform a set of functions relevant to society, in what situation are they?

If we try to observe the way they relate to society, we can observe their haemostasis and their entropies. The key to understanding the balance of the system is haemostasis. But when systems are analysed, their entropies are essentially sought. This is the force that competes for its deterioration.

And here we are led to the realization, which stems from the post-pandemic observation, that the impossibility and absence of laughter in Portuguese museums is a sign of its entropy. Of its aging. From its decay as I have already glazed here. One solution to the problem would be to let The Laughter get in to Portuguese museums. If you knew how to do it…

Categorias
Ecomuseus educação patrimonial

The Costume Museum of São Brás de Alportel and the signs of the decadence of museums in Portugal?

The signs of the decadence of museums in Portugal have been increasing sharply over the years of the Pandemic. The case of the Museu do Traje de São Brás is a paradigmatic example.

There have been some references to the case in the regional press, with little emphasis on national channels, with particular relevance to the silence of organizations representing museums and their professionals.

APOM, through the voice of its president João Neto, has sought to intervene constructively (https://www.sulinformacao.pt/2021/08/museu-do-traje-de-sao-bras-pode-tentar-reconciliacao-atraves- de-exposure-on-mercy/) to overcome conflicts.

The warning signal dates back to June, with the attentive José D’ Encarnação giving the cry “Save the Museum” (https://notascomentarios.blogspot.com/2021/07/vamos-salvar-o-museu.html?fbclid =IwAR2IGylM0A5kVJ7XleBiqFFJ8BwR3DC8KTugmK8MkIBxqbkhJeUi3QzlYbI), accompanied days later by the ever-attentive Dália Paulo (https://www.sulinformacao.pt/2021/08/museu-do-traje-de-o-patrio-sao-human-saobras) -cultural-to-safeguard/)

On the part of ICOM nothing emerged. One might think that the fairs would divert attention. Despite the relevance of the dispute about the free admission of museum professionals in temporary exhibitions of public facilities (https://icom-portugal.org/noticias/), yet another sign of decadence, the case of São Brás seems to be absent from the schedule. A sign of his rampant elitism.

Even more shocking will be the absence of a public position from MINOM Portugal. Emanuel Sancho was president of this ICOM Affiliate Structure, except for three mandates (between 2008-2018), with the Museum of São Brás having hosted relevant initiatives of Social Museology, some of which with international references. The absence of a public position is symptomatic of its decay after the Algarve decade.

But what counts in these cases are the hugs of solidarity that Emanuel Sancho deserves, and the support that his museum will be able to gather in this difficult phase, in the face of demonstrating its relevance in São Brás and for Portuguese museums. (Why being a network shouldn’t everyone be in solidarity when a unit is affected?)

The question, as I understand it, can be summed up in a few words. The Costume Museum of São Brás is supervised by the Santa Casa da Misericórdia. It was the solution found in the early nineties of the last century, when local forces, animated by the dynamics of the local development of Barrocal and Serra do Caldeirão, anchored in a network of local cultural animators, proposed the creation of a “cultural center” in the space of the old mansion inherited by the institution. It was configured in the form of a museum, in a proposal to renew the institutional figure, welcoming community initiatives, serving the community through the work on its memory, and through its work it gained an international dimension. It is this relevant role that the new merciful table legitimately challenges, and that it tries to domesticate for purposes that do not escape readings about the repositioning of local actors, already with more complex objectives. Sifting, the signal that is perceived is once again the voice of the owner taming the local initiative

The externalities of museums are always difficult to account for for grocers and wild ducks, more interested in building tall and insisting on solutions from the past. They are short term views. We have witnessed for decades the transformation of the landscape, social and natural, that has renewed this region. Dynamics of transformation are present that this museum seeks to take advantage of, asking it now to become a docile and obedient museum of the past. If this museum does not understand the opportunities to face social challenges, it will be like so many other dead, lifeless places, fed by people from the past and occasional curators.

That is why I speak of the decay of Portuguese museums, which remain incapable of demonstrating their relevance in society.

Antero de Quental, back in 1871, lectured on the “Causes of the Decay of Peninsular Peoples”. There were, according to his positive thinking, and if memory serves me correctly, three causes: religious, political and economic. Religious, because inquisitorial thinking had clouded Renaissance creativity; Political, because centralism had annihilated the dynamics of the councils; and economic, because the atavism of the slave trade (from the prey of the Discoveries) had crippled the creative force of the creative cities.

By evoking the poet Antero at the end of a hundred and fifty years, we have to give some context to this generation of seventy who tried, without great success, to renew the cultural life of the nation. Positive thinking, the search for causes with a deterministic process of evaluating its consequences, was dominant in time. Also the theme of Decadence was fashionable. In Literature and History: Fed by a late romanticism aside; and Arnold Tonybee’s March to Progress (civilization) readings. Herculano and Martins undertook to give them relevance.

But let’s go to the signs. From my point of view all the signs are there. The new religion, evoking sustainability, evokes money that does not enter the museum’s cash register, hindering its autonomy, centralizing decision-making and condemning the museum to a vegetative, lethargic state. Unless, of course, it bows to the predatory logics of tourism and the circumstantial power of this time and the agendas of its actors.

Signs in a country that is indignant at the fragmentation of its heritage objects and remains unable to face the great transition that complexity in the world shows us in these times of anger.

PS: Nor will it be surprising the silences of the universities that cultivate critical studies of heritage. There will also be signs…

Categorias
educação patrimonial

The Portuguese Dance to Like Her Own project

Projeto a Dança Portuguesa a Gostar de si mesma

This an interesting project. In the videos I analyzed there are some common features. They are recorded outdoors, always in a rural or heritage space. Almost all of the participants are of some age and seem to act in a specific way for the recording. They can act in pairs, individually or in a group of more than five participants. They can act through movement (dance) accompanied with music, whether choir or singing. Generally speaking, this type of collection, made specifically for the recording, loses all the activity that precedes the performative moment and what happens to it. It is also not clear how the dance is performed in a community context. However, due to the testimony value, it represents a high patrimonial value.

After observing the three videos, it is verified that the observation of movement quality is possible with quality. However, given the circumstance of the performative act, she is not very exuberant and explores the body in a limited way. Perhaps because of the age of the dancers and the filming context, the movements are very simple and contained. The body’s potential is little explored. There is also no scope for great innovation and creativity. Since it is a rural heritage, the movements seem to have been crystallized. It is possible to observe in some of the movement links to traditional European dances, which in the late 19th and early 20th centuries favored traditional Portuguese dances, such as polka and mazurka. Mostly, it is clear that they were circle dances or cirandas, which were adopted. It is also curious to realize that these dances were originally urban, having been later installed and adapted in rural environments in hybrid forms. In some cases, it is possible to observe an adaptation in the dances presented with work songs.
There are some works in this area that could be mobilized to enrich this site.

Categorias
educação patrimonial

Liking Portuguese dance for its own sake

A Dança Portuguesa a Gostar dela Própria (Liking Portuguese dance for its own sake) is a research project, creating a video register and promoting all the different dance styles from the whole country.

A Dança Portuguesa a Gostar Dela Própria collects traditional Portuguese dances danced by folklore groups and other kinds of dance groups, who are the protagonists in the preservation of traditional choreographies. However, this project also includes traditional dances of other origin which are currently danced in our country, as well as urban and contemporary dances.

A Dança Portuguesa a Gostar Dela Própria aims at preserving traditional dance and music, fusing it with contemporary elements and making it appealing and accessible for a wide range of audiences. Besides, this project tries to initiate reflection about the role of dance as a tool to find identity, to value traditional knowledge, to express oneself, and to recognise and interact with others.

A Dança Portuguesa a Gostar Dela Própria also continues the mission of PédeXumbo, the promotion of traditional music and dance in Portugal. It is the first element of a portal for dances, which provides detailed information on the music and choreographies and sheds light on their backgrounds, their origins and the people behind them.

Enter this virtual laboratory, experiment, discover and dance on a choreographic journey through Portugal and contribute keeping Portuguese dance alive and dynamic.

Categorias
educação patrimonial

Teeling Storis about cities

In this video works to promote the Apuan Riviera in Italy as a tourist destination, as part of the promotional campaign Apuan Riviera: Emotions on stage. Produced as an outcome of the Dance (Algo)rhythms activities of the Culture Moves project, this video showcases a video-mapping installation created by Studio RF that re-uses Europeana and other archival content alongside a related dance performance. It can be seen as an example of dance, digital content and tourism interacting to tell the story of a place. What do you notice about the interactions between dance and the digital in how it tells the story of the Apuan Rivera?

Categorias
Billets

Carlos Serra the Bearded Sociologist from Mozambique

Carlos Serra (1941 -2020) was a Mozambican sociologist who stood out for developing a critical and autonomous thought of the Mozambican reality from the Center for African Studies in Maputo. The CEA created by Aquino de Bragança and Ruth Feist in the years after independence, is one of the most notable research centers in Africa.

Carlos Serra

One of his best-known books “Combats for the Sociological Mentality”, of which two volumes were published, constitutes a sociology manual.
As a committed intellectual, Serra develops a work of observation of the Mozambican reality using the tools of classical sociology, of phanophone tradition.

One of his most important books, The History of Mozambique, resulted from his work as a History teacher, in the city of Beira, where for the first time, in a Mozambican context, the evolution of African societies was approached and, in practical classes, he took his students to Monte Chinhamapere to observe the cave paintings in situ. ”.
In 1975, he organized the Eduardo Mondlane University’s history department, one of the only courses that FRELIMO maintained in operation and there he prepared the “History of Mozambique: first sedentary and the impact of merchants” manual, an edition then made in photocopy and more afternoon edited by the publisher Tempo in graphic copy. In 1982 it will be the first manual in the history of Pais, a work that also involves a generation of historians, such as Teresa Cruz e Silva, Borges Coelho, among others.
In the nineties, in Paris, at the School of Higher Studies in Social Sciences in Paris, he will complete his doctorate in sociology. His work will then continue to be influenced by Durkheim and Touraine. Back in Mozambique, his object of study will be social representations. Mozambique and Mozambicans will be devoured and become the object of research into everyday practices in the search for sociological intelligibility. We have as social identity, miscegenation, conflict or social roles are research topics.
In the 1980s, he addressed and faced the issues of racism and ethnicity, slavery and trafficking in children, the exercise of power. He will remember the research work on popular justice and the lynching in the great popular uprisings in Maputo at the end of the century. He will become known as an everyday ethnographer (Elísio Macamo), a job he conducted in his sociology workshop at CEA.

Carlos Serra the Bearded Sociologist from Mozambique
Carlos Serra (-2020) was a Mozambican sociologist who stood out for developing a critical and autonomous thought of the Mozambican reality from the Center for African Studies in Maputo. The CEA created by Aquino de Bragança and Ruth Feist in the years after independence, is one of the most notable research centers in Africa.
One of his best-known books “Combats for the Sociological Mentality”, of which two volumes were published, constitutes a sociology manual.
As a committed intellectual, Serra develops a work of observation of the Mozambican reality using the tools of classical sociology, of phanophone tradition.
One of his most important books, The History of Mozambique, resulted from his work as a History teacher, in the city of Beira, where for the first time, in a Mozambican context, the evolution of African societies was approached and, in practical classes, he took his students to Monte Chinhamapere to observe the cave paintings in situ. ”.
In 1975, he organized the Eduardo Mondlane University’s history department, one of the only courses that FRELIMO maintained in operation and there he prepared the “History of Mozambique: first sedentary and the impact of merchants” manual, an edition then made in photocopy and more afternoon edited by the publisher Tempo in graphic copy. In 1982 it will be the first manual in the history of Pais, a work that also involves a generation of historians, such as Teresa Cruz e Silva, Borges Coelho, among others.
In the nineties, in Paris, at the School of Higher Studies in Social Sciences in Paris, he will complete his doctorate in sociology. His work will then continue to be influenced by Durkheim and Touraine. Back in Mozambique, his object of study will be social representations. Mozambique and Mozambicans will be devoured and become the object of research into everyday practices in the search for sociological intelligibility. We have as social identity, miscegenation, conflict or social roles are research topics.
In the 1980s, he addressed and faced the issues of racism and ethnicity, slavery and trafficking in children, the exercise of power. He will remember the research work on popular justice and the lynching in the great popular uprisings in Maputo at the end of the century. He will become known as an everyday ethnographer (Elísio Macamo), a job he conducted in his sociology workshop at CEA.

From 2006 he became a blogger and wrote Diaraio dum Sociologo, which he will keep until his death (https://oficinadesociologia.blogspot.com/) alongside with a photographer’s diary, where he offered us a lens on life of Maputo.
He was a bearded sociologist!

Categorias
economia solidaria

Bussula

Projetos na área cultural

Fundação GDA

LAB . Projetos

Gerador

O MUSEU do futuro

 

 

Categorias
Billets

The power of translocal networks on urban commons-based initiatives

SSE&COMMONS Webnar – The power of translocal networks on urban commons-based initiatives

Pesquisar OpenEdition Search

Você sera redirecionado para OpenEdition Search